Friday, July 23, 2010

Unique sample

Two young orphans have nowhere to go but the street...

Dimensions: 60 x 80 cm
Materials: Oil on canvas


Hen Sophal - Orphans - REF 109-1050-1.jpg
Hen Sophal - Orphans - REF 109-1050-1.jpg


Read more ►
Unique sample

Rainy day in Phnom Penh, in front of the national art museum.

Dimensions: 50 x 80 cm
Materials: Oil on canvas


Hen Sophal - Deluge in Phnom Penh - REF 109-1048-1.jpg
Hen Sophal - Deluge in Phnom Penh - REF 109-1048-1.jpg

Read more ►
The first time we discovered his gallery, we fell in love with one of his works figuring Apsara. She was not comparable to other representations of these celestial dancers: Her Grace, her warm colors and her gesture won our heart at first glance. From there, we decided to meet her creator.

He is a passionate painter and a renowned photographer of beautiful things.
He cultivates secrecy. He agrees to deliver some of his works. I must admit that this is not the ones I prefer the most: I'm more delighted with his surrealist style, closer to the classicism of the Sun King Louis XIV.

Waiting to win his full confidence, we offer you to discover some of the commands made by his clients - who are also his fans.

PS: We apologize for the poor quality of photographs. We'll present you better in a short time.

Please request a free quotation by filling out the form below.
Materials: Oil on canvas

Dimensions in centimeters Number of subjects Price in USD Completion Time
40 x 50 1 326 7 days
50 x 60 1 378 10 days
70 x 100 1 550 14 days
90 x 120 1 to 4 350 per subject 30 days

1. Name: *
2. Email: *
3. Telephone: *
4. Address for delivery: *
5. Choose canvas dimensions in cm: *
  • 40 x 50 - 1 subject
  • 50 x 60 - 1 subject
  • 70 x 100 - 1 subject
  • 90 x 120 - 1 to 4 subjects
6. Upload your photograph or picture to be painted (high resolution prefered) *
7. Message - Detail your commissioning work: *
5.  

Hen Sophal.jpg
Hen Sophal.jpg
Hen Sophal.jpg
Hen Sophal.jpg
Hen Sophal.jpg
Hen Sophal.jpg
Read more ►

Wednesday, June 30, 2010


means in Sanskrit: "the Lord who oversees", one of the great Bodhisattva of the Mahayana Buddhism, he is “the Lord of compassion”. During Jayavarman VII's reign his cult enjoyed an unprecedented favor. An invention from the Khmer art of the XIIth century, his radiant form conveys the idea that the body of Bodhisattva Akvaloktesvara is a macrocosm and each door of his skin is a universe in which meditate a little Buddha. The formal transcription of this idea portrays a divinity whose body is sprinkled with meditating little Buddha.

According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara is the bodhisattva who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he had assisted every being on Earth in achieving nirvana. Mahayana sutras associated with Avalokitesvara include the Heart Sutra (as disciple of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni) and the Lotus Sutra, particularly the 25th chapter, which is sometimes referred to as the Avalokitesvara Sutra.

Six forms of Avalokitesvara in Mahayana (defined by Tian-tai, terrace): 1. great compassion, 2. great loving-kindness, 3. lion-courage, 4. universal light, 5. leader amongst gods and men, 6. the great omnipresent Brahman. Each of this bodhisattva's six qualities of pity, etc., breaks the hindrances respectively of the (6 realms) hells, pretas (hungry ghost), animals, asuras (demi gods), men, and devas (divine beings).

In Buddhism, a bodhisattva is either an enlightened (bodhi) existence (sattva) or an enlightenment-being or, given the variant Sanskrit spelling satva rather than sattva, "heroic-minded one (satva) for enlightenment (bodhi)." Another term is "wisdom-being." It is anyone who, motivated by great compassion, has generated bodhicitta, which is a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings.

The bodhisattva is a popular subject in Buddhist art.

Dimensions: 17 x 10 x 10 cm
Weight: 2.3 kg
Materials: Sandstone from Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Lokesvara Head - REF 0812-1 .jpg
Lokesvara Head - REF 0812-1 .jpg
Lokesvara Head - REF 0812-1 .jpg
Lokesvara Head - REF 0812-1 .jpg

Read more ►

was a spiritual teacher who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha (P. sammasambuddha, S. samyaksambuddha ) of our age, "Buddha" meaning "awakened one" or "the enlightened one." The time of his birth and death are uncertain: Most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE; more recently, however, at a specialist symposium on this question, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha's death, with others supporting earlier or later dates.

Dimensions: 17 x 10 x 10 cm
Weight: 2.3 kg
Materials: Sandstone from Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Buddha Head - REF 0808-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0808-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0808-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0808-1.jpg

Read more ►

was a spiritual teacher who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha (P. sammasambuddha, S. samyaksambuddha ) of our age, "Buddha" meaning "awakened one" or "the enlightened one." The time of his birth and death are uncertain: Most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE; more recently, however, at a specialist symposium on this question, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha's death, with others supporting earlier or later dates.

Dimensions: 17 x 10 x 10 cm
Weight: 2.3 kg
Materials: Sandstone from Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Buddha Head - REF 0804-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0804-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0804-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0804-1.jpg

Read more ►

was born around 1120 or 1125, son of King Dharanindravarman II (r. 1150 -1160) and queen Sri Jayarajacudamani. He married a very religious, strong-minded, and devote princess, Jayarajadevi. After her death, he married her sister Indradevi. The two women are commonly thought to have been a great inspiration to him (both before he gained the throne and during the early years of his reign), particularly in his unusual devotion to Buddhism. Only one previous Khmer king had been a Buddhist.

He was one of the most forceful and productive kings of the Khmer Empire of Angkor. He expanded the empire to its greatest territorial extent and engaged in a building program that yielded numerous temple, highways, rest houses, and hospitals.

Though practically nothing is known of Jayavarman's childhood and youth, it is clear that during his late 30s and early 40s he settled in the neighboring kingdom of Champa, in what is now the central region of Vietnam.

When his father died, his brother or cousin - Yasovarman - appears to have claimed the throne, in which Jayavarman seems to renounce and to have gone on a voluntary exile to Champa. He left his wife and went to Champa alone.

In 1166 Tribhuvanadityavarman, a court official, usurped the throne of King Yasovarman. When Prince Jayavarman received word of a palace rebellion, he hastened to return to Cambodia - perhaps to support King Yasovarman II or to assert his own rights to the throne. But his was too late. When he arrived, Yasovarman was already dead and the usurper firmly seated on the throne. Jayavarman seemed unwilling to attempt to overthrow Tribhuvanadityavarman by force; instead he decided to remain in his homeland and to await an opportunity to assert his own claim to the throne.

Some 12 years later, when Jayavarman was in his late 50s, that opportunity came as a result of a Cham invasion in 1177, which brought about the demise of Tribhuvanadityavarman, the sacking of Angkor, and its subjection to foreign rule. In this situation Jayavarman organized a struggle for independence and in less than five years he succeeded in driving out the invaders and establishing his hegemony over all his Cambodian rivals.

Finally in 1181, at the age of 61, he was crowned a sole king of Khmer Empire and began a brilliant reign of more than 30 years, during which he brought the empire to its zenith, both in terms of territorial expansion and of royal architecture and construction.

Jayavarman VII was a warrior. The greatest military achievement of his reign - perhaps the greatest of the entire history of Cambodia - was the capture and sack of the capital of its rich and powerful neighbor, Champa, in 1190. His military activities also bringing southern Laos, portions of the Malay Peninsula and Burma under his control.

But increasingly he devoted his energies and organizational capacities to the kind of religious and religio-political construction projects that had been carried on by his royal predecessors. He built a large number of awesome new temples, including the Bayon, a distinctively Mahayana Buddhist central pyramid temple designed to serve as the primary locus of the royal cult and also as his own personal mausoleum; personal funerary temples of the Mahayana type, which were dedicated to his mother and father; and a series of provincial temples, which housed reduced replicas of the Royal Buddha. He rebuilt the city of Angkor Thom and rebuilt and extended the system of highways, which radiated outward from the Bayon and the royal palace and reached far into the provinces. In addition, he constructed 121 rest houses along these roads.

During his reign, the King built 102 hospitals, which he dispersed throughout his kingdom. Those hospitals were built in an attempt to improve conditions of the King's subject.

Jayavarman succeeded during his lifetime in creating a legacy that few monarchs in Khmer history have been able to equal. He was more than 90 years old when he died in around 1215.

Dimensions: 17 x 10 x 10 cm
Weight: 2.3 kg
Materials: Sandstone from Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0800-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0800-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0800-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0800-1.jpg

Read more ►

was a spiritual teacher who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha (P. sammasambuddha, S. samyaksambuddha ) of our age, "Buddha" meaning "awakened one" or "the enlightened one." The time of his birth and death are uncertain: Most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE; more recently, however, at a specialist symposium on this question, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha's death, with others supporting earlier or later dates.

Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 6 cm
Weight: 0.5 kg
Materials: Sandstone of Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Buddha Head - REF 0756-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0756-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0756-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0756-1.jpg
Buddha Head - REF 0756-1.jpg

Read more ►

was born around 1120 or 1125, son of King Dharanindravarman II (r. 1150 -1160) and queen Sri Jayarajacudamani. He married a very religious, strong-minded, and devote princess, Jayarajadevi. After her death, he

married her sister Indradevi. The two women are commonly thought to have been a great inspiration to him (both before he gained the throne and during the early years of his reign), particularly in his unusual devotion to Buddhism.

Only one previous Khmer king had been a Buddhist.

He was one of the most forceful and productive kings of the Khmer Empire of Angkor. He expanded the empire to its greatest territorial extent and engaged in a building program that yielded numerous temple, highways, rest houses,

and hospitals.

Though practically nothing is known of Jayavarman's childhood and youth, it is clear that during his late 30s and early 40s he settled in the neighboring kingdom of Champa, in what is now the central region of Vietnam.

When his father died, his brother or cousin - Yasovarman - appears to have claimed the throne, in which Jayavarman seems to renounce and to have gone on a voluntary exile to Champa. He left his wife and went to Champa alone.

In 1166 Tribhuvanadityavarman, a court official, usurped the throne of King Yasovarman. When Prince Jayavarman received word of a palace rebellion, he hastened to return to Cambodia - perhaps to support King Yasovarman II or to

assert his own rights to the throne. But his was too late. When he arrived, Yasovarman was already dead and the usurper firmly seated on the throne. Jayavarman seemed unwilling to attempt to overthrow Tribhuvanadityavarman by

force; instead he decided to remain in his homeland and to await an opportunity to assert his own claim to the throne.

Some 12 years later, when Jayavarman was in his late 50s, that opportunity came as a result of a Cham invasion in 1177, which brought about the demise of Tribhuvanadityavarman, the sacking of Angkor, and its subjection to

foreign rule. In this situation Jayavarman organized a struggle for independence and in less than five years he succeeded in driving out the invaders and establishing his hegemony over all his Cambodian rivals.

Finally in 1181, at the age of 61, he was crowned a sole king of Khmer Empire and began a brilliant reign of more than 30 years, during which he brought the empire to its zenith, both in terms of territorial expansion and of royal

architecture and construction.

Jayavarman VII was a warrior. The greatest military achievement of his reign - perhaps the greatest of the entire history of Cambodia - was the capture and sack of the capital of its rich and powerful neighbor, Champa, in 1190. His

military activities also bringing southern Laos, portions of the Malay Peninsula and Burma under his control.

But increasingly he devoted his energies and organizational capacities to the kind of religious and religio-political construction projects that had been carried on by his royal predecessors. He built a large number of awesome new

temples, including the Bayon, a distinctively Mahayana Buddhist central pyramid temple designed to serve as the primary locus of the royal cult and also as his own personal mausoleum; personal funerary temples of the Mahayana

type, which were dedicated to his mother and father; and a series of provincial temples, which housed reduced replicas of the Royal Buddha. He rebuilt the city of Angkor Thom and rebuilt and extended the system of highways,

which radiated outward from the Bayon and the royal palace and reached far into the provinces. In addition, he constructed 121 rest houses along these roads.

During his reign, the King built 102 hospitals, which he dispersed throughout his kingdom. Those hospitals were built in an attempt to improve conditions of the King's subject.

Jayavarman succeeded during his lifetime in creating a legacy that few monarchs in Khmer history have been able to equal. He was more than 90 years old when he died in around 1215.

Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 6 cm
Weight: 0.5 kg
Materials: Sandstone of Siem Reap
Method: Hand carved

Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0751-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0751-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0751-1.jpg
Jayavarman VII Head - REF 0751-1.jpg

Read more ►

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Unique sample

Remarkable craftsmanship of khmer artists. Precision work. An unmatched finish and rendering. The alliance of traditions and fine arts embodied by the most talented craftsmen artists. We are honored and proud to promote them.

was a spiritual teacher who founded Buddhism. In most Buddhist traditions, he is regarded as the Supreme Buddha (P. sammasambuddha, S. samyaksambuddha ) of our age, "Buddha" meaning "awakened one" or "the enlightened one." The time of his birth and death are uncertain: Most early 20th-century historians dated his lifetime as c. 563 BCE to 483 BCE; more recently, however, at a specialist symposium on this question, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha's death, with others supporting earlier or later dates.

Dimensions: 50 x 30 x 28 cm
Weight: 10.0 kg
Materials: Hard Dense Wood
Method: Hand carved

Buddha Head - Masterpiece REF 0608-1.jpg
Buddha Head - Masterpiece REF 0608-1.jpg
Buddha Head - Masterpiece REF 0608-1.jpg

Read more ►